Volatility

August 21, 2017

Politics is Dead, Only the Movement Can Bring Life

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It’s wishful thinking to believe that all the systemic horrors will, in the near future, quickly collapse. It’s equally wishful to believe that if everyone just sits passively, doing nothing more than “prepping” on an atomized individual level (and usually not even doing that, just talking about it on the internet), the rising turbulence is likely to bring down the elites before it first further guts the people. On the contrary, it’s far more likely that those peak oil Galtians will hang separately because they refused to hang together.
 
That’s why I insist that the only way we the people can navigate this turbulence with the best chance of adapting to the crises and minimizing the damage is to build the movement which will be simultaneously self-defense, preservation of what little can be salvaged from modernity, and most of all the vehicle of the necessary transformation on the basis of agroecology and other ecological evolutions which are necessary if humanity is to have a future at all. Right now humanity is reduced to the level of the original mammals skulking in the underbrush while giant reptiles still ruled the Earth. So far it looks like no one has any idea other than the remain in that state, even once the reptiles are gone.
 
It’s also true that the stronger this human movement, the more effectively it can help hasten the downfall of the productionist corporate system. In the same way that economic factors will limit how much fossil fuel ultimately will be extracted and burned, so political factors can, if organized and deployed the right way, also limit this and other aspects of corporate power and ability to sustain itself. That’s one of the main reasons I’ve been so emphatic about the possibilities of fighting it out in the food and agriculture sectors. (Of course I don’t say that political factors have been well organized and deployed so far. On the contrary, almost all “political” people in the West today are morbid cultists of historically disproven electoralism. This is a core reason why Politics is Dead.)
 
When I ponder the low traffic and sparse comments this site currently receives, I recall how I used to do much better when I wrote about Wall Street. That was also in the years immediately following the 2008 forced crash. More people were more radical, and it’s easier to condemn Wall Street than to think about our food and feel obligated to actually do something about it, where there’s so many opportunities for constructive action even right now. That’s by contrast with opposition to the finance sector, where it’s difficult to see where one could even get started with action.
 
The other problem is how self-imprisoned everyone has become by social media. It’s a mass disease. But there’s enough of an historical record already to prove that no meaningful thought or action can get off the ground from social media. It can be used as a supplement to thought and organization cultivated elsewhere, as publicity media only. But ideas and initial attempts at organization can only be strangled in the cradle, if they try to arise on social media in the first place.
 
But try telling that to people, try deprogramming them to get them off Facebook or Twitter and onto more human media platforms. It’s literally like talking to a wall: They won’t even reply to such a proposal, let alone try to make a rational argument. But then, that’s standard for all cultists today. I say this in the knowledge that the blogosphere missed its first big chance to be an incubator of new ideas, mostly because it too became dominated by system “reformists”. But I think the potential remains. I do think the internet has one last chance to be constructive for humanity, while there’s still enough grid electricity to power it and still enough flexibility and open space in the structure for independents and dissidents to evade censorship like Google’s and still effectively propagate a message so that large numbers of motivated users, and in certain cases like food even the unmotivated, can register it. But this space, this frontier, is closing rapidly.