Volatility

March 20, 2019

Ten Years

Filed under: Climate Crisis, Dance of Death — Tags: , , , — Russell Bangs @ 12:06 pm

>

 
 
Today’s the tenth birthday of this blog. This is post # 1,237. Looking back at March 20th, 2009 I see that I posted six times on that first day. Most or all of those I’d previously posted as “diaries” at Chris Martenson’s site. Four are about Wall Street, one on globalization, and one on the fake climate movement. So I knew where I was headed from day one.
 
My first budding principle as a child, my first thought which as a child came intuitive, instinctive, something innate responding to what I saw of reality, which later would become a philosophical and spiritual principle…
 
I saw that nature is transcendent, beautiful and fulfilling, a value in itself, its healthy and whole existence is as important for humans as for every other species, and that the way humans are destroying it is horrific, evil, insane beyond the capacity of words to convey.
 
That was my first spirit thought, my first philosophy. In the end I feel it always remained my only underlying thought.
 
And I heard the scream of Gaia. At the time I heard it as a cry of despair. I got older and for many years I tried not to hear the scream. For many years I tried to find some place which could reconcile what I know intellectually and feel morally, with still being able to find something possible to believe in within the framework of the civilization. Most of all where I wouldn’t keep hearing the screaming of Gaia which I’ve heard so loudly since I was a child.
 
Trouble is the screams only kept getting louder, and meanwhile anywhere I tried to find integrity I found only different mutations of the same ecocidal lust, psychopathy, satanism, corruption, hypocrisy, double-standards, lies, and vile gluttony. In nihilistic moments I’d say to myself, why not just chuck out all human integrity, since none seems to exist?
 
Well, I decide the better path is simply to look to nothing but the assured self-destruction of the destroyers of the Earth. Those who take up the sword of ecocide will be their own keystone victim. We can only pray the suicide of the genocidal-ecocidal civilization happens fast enough (and without nuclear war) that Gaia, including the true natural humanity, has something to salvage. For humans that’s a long-shot, and I’m a pessimist about avoiding nuclear war, but I guess that’s my version of optimism. Gaia shall endure and once again thrive, in one phase or another.
 
Meanwhile the call of Gaia which resounds is no longer only a call of despair, seemingly from the past. Now I hear it more present, more insistent, louder than ever. And increasingly the despair is being transformed into rage.
 
 
 
 
 

5 Comments »

  1. A new exhibit at the British Museum seems to clear up a longstanding debate. The figure in the painting is not screaming, but hearing a scream.

    In a new exhibit titled Edvard Munch: Love and Angst, the museum features a lithograph version of the image that predated the iconic 1893 painting. Scrawled along the bottom is an inscription by the artist: “I felt the great scream throughout nature.”

    The cryptic sentence refers to a walk Munch took near a fjord overlooking Oslo. He described it in a diary entry headed “Nice 22 January 1892”: I was walking along the road with two friends – the sun was setting – suddenly the sky turned blood red – I paused, feeling exhausted, and leaned on the fence – there was blood and tongues of fire above the blue-black fjord and the city – my friends walked on, and I stood there trembling with anxiety – and I sensed an infinite scream passing through nature.”

    Another bit of supporting evidence: The painting’s original German title was “Der Schrei der Natur,” or “The Scream of Nature.”…

    https://followmehere.com/2019/03/22/the-figure-in-edvard-munchs-the-scream-isnt-actually-screaming/

    Comment by Russell Bangs — March 22, 2019 @ 1:16 pm

  2. Read The Wisdom of the Fields by HJ Massingham. You will like it. Have you read Scott’s Seeing like a State?

    Comment by bevin — April 1, 2019 @ 10:26 am

    • I own copies of that and a couple others by Scott but haven’t gotten around to reading them yet. I’m not familiar with Massingham but will check it out, thanks.

      Comment by Russell Bangs — April 1, 2019 @ 12:11 pm

  3. I found your blog from a comment you made on MOA. Astounding body of information presented in a manner that is clear and comprehensible. I am actively passing it along,
    thank you

    Comment by rose — April 15, 2019 @ 1:59 am


RSS feed for comments on this post. TrackBack URI

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: