Volatility

March 20, 2010

Birthday

Filed under: Freedom, Health Racket Bailout, Relocalization — Russ @ 4:50 am

 

How about that – today’s my blog’s birthday. 🙂
 
I guess the system didn’t pack it in yet just because I’ve been on the case, but I’ll keep plugging away at it.
 
There’s so few of us who recognize the necessity and the possibility of non-linear change. As a rule it’s pretty lonely recognizing that. And yet the days we’re going through now are the best, last chance humanity is going to have.
 
It’s unfortunate that most of those who by all rights should have been fighting like wolverines to seize this opportunity, and celebrating every moment of the fight, instead chose to throw away everything they had ever claimed to believe in for the sake of a fraudulent political expediency. This is the latest example of throwing away freedom for the sake of security and ending up with neither.
 
The question is whether you start from the fact of what you wish to achieve, and what you wish to avert, and then try to find the action that gets you there; or do you instead start with a defeatist assumption regarding what’s possible, and the paltry belief that getting “something”, no matter how anemic, compromised, and fraudulent, is better than running the risk of losing the good fight for a real principle; do you even start with a misguided, anachronistic good-civics delusion about “moderation” and “compromise” being good in themselves, and then set your goal and if necessary diminish your feelings and principles, according to these wretched tactical shackles?
 
But compromise is only a tactic, not an intrinsic good (and self-compromise isn’t even a tactic, but unilateral surrender). It’s good if it helps accomplish something good. But where it cannot work, and where it’s only a fig leaf for cowardice or treachery, it’s an evil. And the fact is, we live today in an uncompromising age. Thus those who by nature want to compromise have no future.
 
This person that many call a “president” came into office with a unique opportunity to really fight for real change, if he’d only had the ideals and courage to believe the people when they said they voted for Change with a capital C. I know I would have taken them at their word. I’d have staked my presidency upon my belief in the people and my acceptance of the mandate they gave me.
 
Then we would have found out if for once Shock and Awe can work in the right direction. It was the opportunity of a lifetime.
 
(As we know, Obama was simply lying when he claimed he’d bring change, and even in the rare instances where he might want to do something he lacks the spine to follow through. Thus in every single case, with no exception, he either acted directly as the agent of evil, as in the case of the Bailout, the Permanent War, and the health rackets; or he caved in the moment he was resisted, as in the case of Israeli settlements.
 
Obama never intended to seize his chance, and now it’s gone. History will revile him for his failure, at the same time monstrous and pathetic.)
 
Yet in the biggest sense the opportunity is still there for non-linear change. Not from the top down, but from other directions. I’ve always believed real change is desirable in this corrupt world, and nowadays it’s also the only politically possible path. The old rules have been proven once and for all no longer to work. Today the reformist rut is a dead-end ditch.
 
The only chance of achieving breakaway speed is to shoot for the stars.
 

“Il nous faut de l’audace, et encore de l’audace, et toujours de l’audace” – We must dare, and again dare, and forever dare. – Danton

 
The road of boldness is the only road there is. Otherwise one must fester motionless in the ditch. Setting the most radical goal is also the most politically practical strategy. Meanwhile nothing could be less practical than setting some picayune “pragmatic” goal.
 
Always remember the rules of the struggle today:
 
No matter what policy or “reform” you advocate, the enemy will always fight it just as hard. There is no compromise unless you compromise yourself. There is no reciprocation. Whether you want to fight for a $2 trillion stimulus or $700 billion, much of it in tax cuts, is your decision, but the enemy will fight either just as hard. Whether you demand single-payer or bust, or whether you settle for a toxic mandate with zero cost controls, is your choice, but you’ll have to fight just as hard for either. (If anything, self-compromising only makes the fight harder. Appeasement always only encourages the enemy, while launching a full uncompromising attack would discourage him.)
 
The enemy’s resistance is a constant. They’re pure feudal obstructionists and reactionaries. So when you negotiate with yourself, the way they did on health “reform”, the only thing you can possibly accomplish is to pointlessly define down the goal you claimed to be fighting for.
 
But either way, the enemy will fight just as hard.
 
So do we believe in real political change? However we discuss that, we must be clear that however possible non-linear change is, by-the-books gradualist change is not at all possible. This is all the more reason to set a great goal and fight for it as the baseline, without any initial concern over the surface political “possibility” of it.
 
When you set a visionary goal, you mobilize, you galvanize the best people. You get the momentum of the best people. Meanwhile setting a wretched, puling, miserable, submissive sell-out goal demoralizes everyone involved. The very radicality of demanding the best could set the tone that it’s a new day, that we should dare to dare, while setting the snivelling, abject goal simply reiterate the status quo, business as usual. Who’d be willing to fight for anything under those circumstances? In that case the sane, reasonable thing would be to give up.
 
Either way, which way you choose, you get the inertia of the best or the worst.
 
(Also, I imagine for many their assessment of the possibility is largely driven by their perception of the desirability. As I’ve said before, many lying “progressives” are actually neoliberal ideologues who in fact side more with Dick Cheney and Lloyd Blankfein more than they do with any true reformer.)
 
In the end, what does it avail one to set small goals he probably can’t achieve anyway? What’s the point of action if he relinquishes the principles which set him in motion in the first place; if he even comes to attack and sneer at those principles where they still exist in others? What was the point of it? Where it’s not a calculated sellout, it can only be nihilism.
 
But if we cherish our principles as our immutable core, as the victory we’ve already won, and where only we can defeat ourselves by betraying ourselves; if we honor our principles by setting in their name a great goal; and if we then fight for that goal, if necessary to the death; if we do these things then even if the struggle fails we’ll still have won the victory history honors the most.
 
History and nature fight on our side. Time has run out for the system’s ability to prop up the debt zombie; the energy has run out for them to keep growing their consumption/destruction level, or even maintain it anywhere near its current level.
 
So those of us who truly rage against the injustice, immorality, ugliness, and destructiveness of the corporate order have a friend in physical and economic reality itself. On every level our cause is moral, rational, reality-based, and simply right.
 
This will be humanity’s ultimate test. Will mankind seize the opportunity, use the structural crisis as the lever for total transformation? Will energy descent mean the final social ascent to the truly human age of decentralized positive democracy and freedom? Or will we submit meekly, lazily, despicably, to the system’s own version of the wind-down, to a new feudal Dark Age?
 
The choice is ours.  

10 Comments

  1. Happy blog birthday. Your writing continues to inspire me.

    Comment by Ross — March 20, 2010 @ 12:36 pm

  2. Happy birthday blog!

    Comment by jimmy james — March 20, 2010 @ 3:32 pm

  3. Thanks, guys. 🙂

    Comment by Russ — March 20, 2010 @ 4:10 pm

  4. I just subscribed a few days ago so I wouldn’t miss anything new.
    I marvel at the truth and clarity in each of your posts. Thanks for your diligent work!

    Comment by Kathleen — March 21, 2010 @ 4:55 pm

    • Thanks, Kathleen.

      Comment by Russ — March 22, 2010 @ 6:18 am

  5. Belated, but I’m so elated (I’m a poet and didn’t even realize it) that I figured I’d throw my wishes in too. Russ, how can I e-mail you?

    Comment by Bloodgroove — April 4, 2010 @ 7:55 pm

    • Thanks, Bloodgroove. Can you give me an idea what you want to e-mail about which can’t be discussed here?

      Comment by Russ — April 5, 2010 @ 9:53 am

  6. I had an idea for a website, but now that I have read more here, it’s probably not suited for you. So, skip the e-mail. It was a bit too forward for me to ask at this stage anyhow, Russ.

    Blog on and I’ll read on.

    Comment by Bloodgroove — April 6, 2010 @ 9:36 am

  7. No prob. 🙂

    Comment by Russ — April 6, 2010 @ 11:20 am

  8. […] This is one reason why we must set great goals as aspire to them with all the force of our being. As I’ve written before, such visionary aspirations are attractive in themselves to the best, most passionate, most […]

    Pingback by Striving for Democracy « Volatility — July 22, 2011 @ 1:11 am


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